Call for Art: DIA asks local artists to create ofrendas for special display

by

comment
The Detroit Institute of Art is asking local artists to submit proposals for ofrendas that will be displayed at the museum from Oct. 24 to Nov. 2.

An ofrenda (Spanish for "offering") is a collection of objects that decorate an altar in order to honor a deceased loved one or friend, a relative by blood or spirit. These altars are created during the Dia de los Muertos celebration that takes place around the same time as Halloween. Generally they include sugar skulls, marigolds, and pictures along with more personal objects meant to comfort the deceased. Beer, a favorite food, cigarettes, playing cards, or any creature comfort cherished by those being honored can also be included in the altar. These objects help personalize the ofrenda, making it a special gift to the departed loved one. 



Artists are asked to submit their proposals by Monday, Sept. 29 and all selected artists will be notified by Monday, Oct. 6. 

Proposals should include a short bio, dimensions of the proposed project, materials to be used, technical needs, a description of the work and an estimated budget along with a sketch of the ofrenda. They should be sent to Carrie Morris, the DIA program manager, at cmorris@dia.org. Check here for more info. 



Artists will receive a small stipend as well as monies for materials to credit the ofrendas. 

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.