Detroit Garment Group Guild blasts Elle Magazine

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The September issue of Elle magazine features a fashion spread that was shot in Detroit and the Detroit Garment Group Guild is non too happy about it.

In a blog posted to their website today the group's president notes that Elle hardly made an effort to visit any of our town's busy and thriving neighborhoods like Corktown or established and noteworthy venues like the Detroit Institute of Arts. Instead the magazine focused on the dilapidated train station (to which, we're sure, Detroit collectively rolled its eyes) and graffitied neighborhoods.



The DG3 does point out that there isn't anything wrong with our town's graffiti, in fact it's a great back drop for fashion shoots, but the point of the story (which, let's face it, does anyone really read the story in Playboy fashion magazines?) is supposed to be about the city's shifting economic state.

The fashion spread features Carolyn Murphy, Shinola's new women's line director. She looks great, but we were disappointed to see she wasn't wearing more Detroit-based brands. 



In short, Elle, you can do better. 

 

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