Pop pick-me-up

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Pop songs are more than just background tunes. At their best, they’re a musical metronome, a life-sustaining pulse inside our otherwise wearied hearts and heads. When we can’t seem to make sense of the hustle and bustle of everyday life, we look to record collections and radio dials for direction and answers. The Aislers Set’s singer-guitarist-producer, Amy Linton, and her Californian cohorts – including members of Poundsign and Track Star – understand this and are more than prepared to keep us afloat when we’re drowning in the day to day.

So with The Last Match they’ve crafted an emotionally expansive world of near-perfect melodic, melancholic pop. Inside the bomp and bop of songs such as "Hit the Snow" and "Been Hiding," the band explores the aftermath of love’s breakdown and breakup. It’s sometimes funny ("I’ll wear all black all day"), though rarely pretty ("And you lied and I lied"), because the Aislers Set also understands that music doesn’t always have the answers – or, at least, the right answers.

So when Linton sings, "Tell me something brave, tell me something kind" on the stunning title track, she’s simply searching for the very thing we all are in music – the courage to make it through another day.

Jimmy Draper writes about music for Metro Times.

Jimmy Draper writes about music for Metro Times. E-mail letters@metrotimes.com.

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