Lake Effect: A Four Way Split

by

comment

Most of the music on the new comp from Grand Rapids imprint Friction channels the spiny guitar tones, lyrical claustrophobia and coed lineups of a time when indie rock didn’t have Internet access, and 7”s were always mailed postpaid. Corcovado’s “Biology of Bees” splays out reverb and distortion over detached female vocals and the melodic build of Sister-era Sonic Youth. “Man at Arms” is louder, with jerky stop-start rhythms that would suggest 21st century post-hardcore if they weren’t so, well, skronky. Yes, the meaningless adjective that once described Brainiac will now be applied to Man at Arms’ wiry frenetics. Neither Man at Arms nor Corcovado makes a huge impression — they rock at one speed only. But both bands manage to suggest the musical throb of 1988-1994 without completely raiding the era. Some of Lake Effects’ most powerful moments come from Coldwater’s “Spit for Athena,” whose Levi Bailey writes songs on the bruised skin stretched between creepy and righteous: “What is that thing you put in me?! Take it out!” he screams over squelch and raw percussion in “I’m Not Going Anywhere.” He’s also preoccupied with masturbation. But in the long view, look what that did for Green Day.

Johnny Loftus writes about music for Metro Times. E-mail letters@metrotimes.com.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.