The Suburbs

by

comment

Everything Arcade Fire does is big: the ballads, the rockers, the kitchen-sink epics. Even the band's more introspective songs are grand in scope. This has been their routine from the start, but on their terrific third album, The Suburbs, they make even the most restrained moments sound as if the fate of the world depends on them. There are plenty of large-scale songs here: "Half Light" and "Sprawl" (of course there has to be a song called "Sprawl" on The Suburbs) are divided into sections, and the two-part title tune bookends the album. Frontman Win Butler and his large cast of supporting players work their way toward a sort of societal separation here, carrying Funeral's requiems and Neon Bible's hymns into a region where subdivisions split communities as well as souls. But The Suburbs' emotional heft is typically vast. Songs like "Ready to Start," "City With No Children" and "Half Light II (No Celebration)" are arena-sized anthems about making connections under adverse circumstances. And, as always, the payoff is big and it's beautiful.

Michael Gallucci writes about film for Metro Times. Send comments to letters@metrotimes.com.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.