City Slang: “Too Much Ain’t Enough” revisited

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When Seduce appeared in the rockumentary movie The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years and said that they were the “best band in Detroit”, they weren’t kidding. This was the late ‘80s, when hardcore punk was all but done with and the world’s eyes were on the dumb, vacuous fun being produced in LA.

Seduce was Detroit’s answer to LA Guns, Poison, Crue and the rest. They were saying, “yes, you can have fun with hair products and tight pants. You can do the whole sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll thing. But you create something artistically relevant, musically challenging and heavy as shit at the same time.

Too Much Ain’t Enough is the follow-up to '86’s self-titled debut album. Recorded two years later, the songs on here are that bit better. The trio of vocalist Mark Andrews, drummer Chuck Burns and guitarist David Black had progressed musically, but it is the quality of the songs that makes the record \stand out.

From the opening “Any Time Or Place” through the band anthem “Crash Landing” to the closing AC/DC-esque filth of “The Slider”, the record showcases most of what was great about Seduce.

Nowadays, the various members are off in other bands like the Shaky Jakes and Crud, but every now and again Seduce reform and revisits these gems. Let’s hope they never stop.

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