Check out Kid Rock's new Niagara-inspired bass drum

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Earlier, we reported that Kid Rock cut a check for $20,000 to author Rob St. Mary to help realize his planned Orbit Magazine anthology, to be released on Wayne State University Press next fall. St. Mary had set up a crowdfunding campaign to raise money for the project with various prizes for different donation levels — including Niagara's 1994 painting “Hot Box #1" for someone with an extra $20,000 burning a hole in his or her pocket. Suffice it to say, Kid Rock is now the proud owner of a Niagara original.


Apparently Rock was so enamored with the painting that he decided to put it on his backing band's bass drum, as photos posted on the Facebook page for Tennessee diner Snow White Drive In indicate. According to the diner's Facebook page, Kid Rock filmed his new music video there on Nov. 15 and as can be seen in their posted photo the painting has been replicated on Kid Rock's bass drum head. Rumor has it the image, which features Niagara's signature lips and cigarette, will also serve as the cover art for his new album, First Kiss, slated for a Feb. 24 release.



According to Rick Manore (publicist for Niagara, among many other titles), the painting was "inspired by Ron Asheton, who would always say to Niagara, 'Don't hotbox that cigarette' on cig-sharing etiquette."





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