?uestlove calls new D'Angelo album the 'Apocalypse Now' of black music

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Only one thing can bring us all together here, this Monday morning of Dec.15, 2014: A totally unexpected, 14 years in the making R&B masterpiece by the king of mystical/ political/ total sexytimes music, D’Angelo which was released in a surprise sneak attack move. The album's release was just announced late last week, and then the digital version available for purchase at midnight last night/ this morning (it's also on Spotify, now). 


Unfortunately, the singer’s third album’s extra-timely, what with lines like “All we wanted was a chance to talk / Instead we only got outlined in chalk” (from “The Charade”). Have only listened to the thing once, but it’s clearly eclectic, bright and brilliant. And it’s called Black Messiah! So good. In a press conference/ listening party hosted by Red Bull Music Academy a few days ago, ?uestlove, who plays on the record, reportedly called it the “Apocalypse Now of black music.” I know I said that already, in the headline, but it bears repeating.



I haven’t been so excited to download anything since the UK TV show Utopia! Man, this is so good and can’t wait to get a physical copy soon. Here’s to hoping there’s a double LP version, as there was belatedly for Voodoo.

Now might be a good time to revisit Nelson George's conversation with the man from May of this year:




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