Third Man revisits White Stripes' strange 'Get Behind Me Satan' for album's 10th anniversary

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2005 was a weird year for the White Stripes. Following the success of White Blood Cells and Elephant, the band could have done whatever they wanted and their sizable following would most likely eat it up. And that's exactly what they did for their follow up, Get Behind Me Satan.

Instead of traveling to another city to record or working with outsiders as they did for the past two efforts, they retreated into the foyer of Jack White's Indian Village home, where they recorded ... Satan by themselves. White had recently broken up with Rene Zellweger, and traded his riff-heavy guitar playing for piano and, inexplicably, a marimba. They started dressing like a mariachi band, and promoted the album by heading first to South America to tour it. 

The album was also curious for being the vinyl-fetishizing duo's only record to not be commercially released on vinyl at the time of its release. And while it's likely that the record will finally see proper release later this year (White's label Third Man was started with the task of reissuing all of the band's albums), Third Man is celebrating the 10-year anniversary of the record by revisiting the era for its latest Vault subscription package.

Centered around a live LP and DVD from the band's performance at the Teatro Amazonas Opera House (the first rock 'n' roll show ever performed there, where the band almost incited a riot), the package also includes a 7-inch of previously unheard demos as well as postcards and a "a badass death head monkey" designed by longtime visual collaborator Rob Jones. Interested fans have until Jan. 31 to sign up for the package over at Third Man's website

This era also contains some of the Stripes' weirdest (and best) B-sides. Here's the strange "Though I Hear You Calling, I Will Not Answer." Totally could have been an A-side.




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