Learn how to copyright your own music today at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

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There is such a thing as World Intellectual Property Day. It's celebrated every April 26, but some Detroiters are celebrating today. 

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is holding a seminar on how to copyright music and trademark ideas including band names and swag. With a huge (and growing) music scene in Detroit, the topic seems ripe for discussion. 



From 3 to 5 p.m. the how-to seminar will feature locals like radio personality and attorney Suzi Marteny and copyright and entertainment lawyer Joe Bellanca. 


Later, from 5 to 6 p.m. there will be a meet and greet with law firms, schools, and music companies and businesses. From 6 to 8:30 p.m. there will be a presentation on how to musicians can protect their music. A question-and-answer panel will include speakers like Christal Sheppard from the Detroit U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Detroit-based bassists Ralphe Armstrong, Big Sean's attorney, and Howard Hertz, who has represented Eminem and Atlantic Records. 

Following the speaker series, there will be a mixer, live music, and refreshments. 

Walk-ins are welcome at the event, but you can also RSVP at worldpdaydetroit@gmail.com. Check facebook.com/worldpdaydetroit for more info. 

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is located at 315 E. Warren Ave., Detroit. 

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