Robin Thicke et al.'s lawyers request 'Blurred Lines' retrial

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In March, a jury ruled that Robin Thicke, Pharrell Williams, and T.I.'s 2013 hit "Blurred Lines" infringed on Marvin Gaye's "Got to Give It Up," and ordered to pay $7.3 million in damages to the Gaye estate. As Thicke et al.'s lawyers previously hinted would happen, a retrial was officially requested on Friday.

In a new motion presented on Friday, the "Blurred Lines" team is taking issue with what they claim were confusing jury instructions and improper evidence. Additionally, they are requesting that the compensation be reduced to less than $680,000 — or five percent of "Blurred Lines"'s non-publishing profits, arguing that the song uses less than five percent of Gaye’s original composition.



Meanwhile, the Gaye estate is seeking to cease further distribution of "Blurred Lines," or a 50 percent cut of all future songwriter and publishing revenues generated by the song. The judge will consider the motions at a hearing on June 29. Read more over at Billboard.

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