ICYMI: Stef Chura's delightful "Slow Motion" video, shot in the UFO Factory's bathroom

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27 year-old native Michigander Stef Chura has her first real debut album in the can now. It’s called Messes, and it was recorded with Fred Thomas just the other month, and it is so awesome. We're running a feature on her shortly so I'll dispense with too much information now. If you have a decent record label, you'd be so smart if you got in touch with her about releasing the thing.

I asked her about this video which was released a few weeks ago for a song from the album, and she replied. 



Metro Times: The “Slow Motion” video looks like it was a lot of fun even though you’re pretending to not have fun. What was that like, how did it come about?

Stef Chura: Back in August of last year Molly (Soda) and I were at a show, I think it was even a Saturday Looks Good to me show… which is funny, at UFO Factory when we came up with the idea of essentially shooting a “party” in the girl’s bathroom at the UFO Factory.



We invited a bunch of friends out and bought a bunch of junk from the dollar store that morning to glitz it up. Molly recorded it all on her Hi-8 camera. What’s funny is we forgot to bring some real speakers to play the song on so a lot of the scenes where people are dancing everyone is actually singing Fetty Wap’s “Trap Queen” a capella.  

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