Happenings 50 years ago: the Beau Biens' moody psych-garage 45

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Yesterday, Ugly Things impressario Mike Stax posted on Facebook about the reissue of a rare Grosse Pointe/Ann Arbor garage-rock 45 from the 1960s. Order copies of this authorized pressing of the Beau Biens' "Times Passed"/ "A Man Who's Lost" right here. One song's a psychedelic anti-war rocker, while the flip is introspective and heavy. Plus, they pressed the thing up at Archer; the same plant that made the original record 50 years earlier!


"The Beau Biens (featured in Ugly Things #40) started out as a Yardbirds-inspired teen band in the Detroit suburb of Grosse Pointe. In the fall of 1966, their home based shifted to the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor where they recorded two originals, “Times Passed” b/w “A Man Who’s Lost,” at the college radio station, WCBN, with producer Joe Doll, known for his pioneering psychedelic radio programs."

"The 1967 disc has earned acclaim worldwide; this re-issue was transferred from the original session tapes by Alec Palao, and produced and remastered by Joe Doll. Like the original, it was pressed at Detroit’s Archer Records. Includes picture sleeve with liner notes and rare photos."


"Frank Uhle is the man behind the reissue, working closely with the record's original producer Joe Doll," Dixon says.



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