Detroit's prodigal son, Wayne Kramer, returns with MC50 performance at Saint Andrew's Hall

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JIM LOUVAU
  • Jim Louvau

It’s never too late to “kick out the jams, motherfuckers!” Last year was a hallmark year for Detroit’s MC5 — the Motor City dudes that shook the rock world with their controversial debut, Kick Out the Jams, which was recorded live over two nights on Devil’s Night and Halloween in 1968 at Detroit’s Grande Ballroom. To celebrate, MC5 founder Wayne Kramer assembled a supergroup appropriately rebranded as MC50, consisting of Kramer, Billy Gould of Faith No More, Marcus Durant of Zen Guerrilla, Kim Thayil of Soundgarden, and Brendan Canty of Fugazi. To coincide with the anniversary, Kramer also released his memoir, The Hard Stuff: Dope, Crime, the MC5, and My Life of Impossibilities, during which Kramer recounts his life in 1974 Detroit. Bars of Gold is also on the bill.

Doors open at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 30, at Saint Andrew's Hall; 431 E. Congress St., Detroit; 313-961-8961; saintandrewsdetroit.com. Tickets are $38+.




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