Keeping the early aughts emo sound alive is Detroit's Antighost, which will play in Pontiac

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CHEYENNE THOMAS
  • Cheyenne Thomas

Emo is alive and well in Detroit, folks, thanks to the high-energy, headbang-and-break-shit outfit Antighost. The band has incited a mosh pit at Vans Warped Tour (RIP) and has literally performed to, like, six people in a random garage in Indiana.

Last year found Sean Shepard, Dylan Vanderson, and Joe Bida backing Animal Panic!, the band’s third record and the latest collection to evolve the brand of teenage angst often associated with the genres Antighost occupies. When Metro Times caught up with Antighost last year, Shepard shed some light on his writing process, which is usually rooted in darkness. “I’m rarely writing when I’m happy because I don’t feel like that a lot, and I know the music wouldn’t be genuine,” he said. “I write music when I’m depressed because that’s what gets me through that period. Sometimes I wish I could write happier music, but I don’t know how good it would be.” Antighost has enlisted Ness Lake, as well as Grand Rapids-based artists Future Misters and the Tube Socks.



Doors open at 7 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 10, at the Pike Room; 1 S. Saginaw St., Pontiac; 248-858-9333; thecrofoot.com. Tickets are $10-$12.




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