New York-based sonic architect Lea Bertucci to perform at Detroit's Trinopsophes

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Lea Bertucci. - COURTESY OF NNA TAPES
  • Courtesy of NNA Tapes
  • Lea Bertucci.

There are musicians, and then there are sound designers. New York City composer and performer Lea Bertucci falls into the latter category, thanks to her commitment to exploring the relationship between what she describes as “biological resonance and acoustic phenomena.”

OK, if that sounds a wee bit abstract, that’s because it is. The classically trained saxophonist moved from classical and jazz music to experimenting with woodwind instruments through various effects, loops, distortion, and electroacoustic feedback. On 2019’s hauntingly sparse and ambient LP Resonant Field, Bertucci turned to the decommissioned Marine A Grain Elevator at Silo City in Buffalo, New York. Through her horn, Bertucci filled the dormant space in hopes of reactivating it while archiving its melancholy. Bertucci will be joined by Saariselka, a collaboration of Marielle Jakobsons and Chuck Johnson. Saariselka’s debut record, 2019’s The Ground Our Sky, offers rolling and patient meditations on meaningful change and our place in the universe.



Doors open at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 29; 1464 Gratiot Ave., Detroit; 313-778-9258; trinosophes.com. Tickets are $10.




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