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Angie Bowie

Talking about summer's pleasures with Angie Bowie

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It's our summer issue so we figured who better to comment on summertime than one Angie Bowie. Why Bowie? Well, we don't exactly know why, seeing as how she likely spends zero time in the sun. But we do know that the still-fetching Ms. Bowie was once frau to the Thin White Duke and parlayed said union into a career as a singer, actress and author. She has just released Lipstick Legends, a fun and personal reminiscence through the glam rock '70s featuring ex-hubby David Bowie, Kim Fowley, Alice Cooper, Cherry Vanilla and lots of other kohl-eyed creatures. Here the ever-randy Bowie — whose 2002 book, Pocket Guide to Bisexuality won her many new young fans — gives up her Top 5 wonders of summer. —Brian Smith

 

5 The spray of the water and the smell of gasoline as the speed-boat picks up speed.

 

I miss going to the outdoors cinemas in Cyprus.

 

3The smell of nail varnish as the summer welcomes your toes to sandals.

 

2 The warm walk to the outdoors parties in seaside towns and the boom of the dance music.

 

1 The lick of salt on your arm as you dry in the sun from swimming at sea.

 

Bowie will read from Lipstick Legends on Thursday, June 14, at the Lido Gallery, 33535 Woodward Ave., Birmingham; 248-792-6248. Hosted by John D. Lamb with songs from Carolyn Striho. Show starts at 7 p.m.

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