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Detroit Tigers — by the numbers

We got yer statistics right here!

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COURTESY PHOTO.
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• Seating capacity at Tiger Stadium (then named Bennett Park) in 1896: 5,000

• Seating capacity at Tiger Stadium (then named Navin Field) in 1912: 23,000

• Seating capacity at Tiger Stadium (then named Navin Field) in 1936: 36,000

• Seating capacity at Briggs Stadium after renovations in 1938: 58,000

• Seating capacity at Comerica Park in 2014: 41,681

• Number of suites at Comerica Park: 93

• Area of the scoreboard, one of the largest in Major League Baseball: 6,096 square feet

• Total weight of scoreboard: 100,000 pounds

• Weight of one of the two tigers situated on top of the scoreboard: 10,000 pounds

• Diameter of the scoreboard’s analog clock face: 16 feet

• Height of the Comerica Park’s Ferris wheel: 50 feet

• Length of wire, cables and pumps used to power the center field fountain: More than four miles

• Amount of water that can be pushed through the fountain per minute: 15,000 gallons 

• Amount of office space at Comerica Park: 36,000 square feet

• Amount of retail space at Comerica park: 70,000 square feet

• Area of Comerica Park ballpark: 788,000 square feet

• Area of Comerica Park, including all outbuildings: over 1 million square feet 

• Cost for the city of Detroit to buy Tiger Stadium in 1977: $1

• Cost of renovations made by the city of Detroit to Tiger Stadium: $8 million 

• Cost to build Comerica Park: $300 million

• Cost of Comerica Park paid by Tigers: $185 million (62 percent)

• Public cost of Comerica Park: $115 million from 2 percent rental-car tax and 1 percent hotel tax, more

• Cost paid by Comerica Bank to have exclusive naming rights for 30 years: $66 million

• Mike and Marian Ilitch’s combined net worth: $3.64 billion

• Tigers 2013 team value: $643 million

• Average time of Opening Day game: 2 hours 49 minutes

• Most consecutive Opening Day starts by Tigers pitcher: Jack Morris, 11 (1980-1990)

• Ty Cobb’s 1914 salary: $15,000 ($357,734.67 in 2014 dollars)

• Cy Young winner Max Scherzer’s 2014 salary: $15.525 million

• Max Scherzer’s earnings per start: $$485,156

• Temperature on first Opening Day at Comerica in 2000: 36 degrees Fahrenheit

• Expected Opening Day 2014 temperature: 52 degrees Fahrenheit

• Tigers’ 2014 total payroll: $157.8 million

• Most strikeouts in a season by a Tigers pitcher: Mickey Lolich, 308 in 1971

• Number of home runs hit at Tiger Stadium: 11,111

• Tigers players, managers and executives in the National Baseball Hall of Fame: 24

• Number of batters that Tigers pitchers struck out in 2013, establishing a new Major League record for most strikeouts in a season: 1,428

• Most runs scored by Tigers on Opening Day (1993): 20 

• Average cost of beer per-ounce at Comerica: $.42 an ounce, or $5.04 for a 12-ounce beer

• Cost of new Poutine Dog at Comerica: $7

• Cost to park in front of Comerica: $25

(Sources: Detroit Tigers Media Guide, The Baseball Stadium Insider: A Comprehensive Dissection of All Thirty Ballparks, the Legendary Players, and the Memorable Moments, Metro Times research, Crain’s Detroit Business, Green Cathedrals, michigan.gov, baseballprospectus.com, baseball-almanac.com, ballparksofbaseball.com, ballparks.com, baseballreference.com, forbes.com, ctpost.com, National Weather Service, Rod Nelson of The Emerald Guide to Baseball 2014

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