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Do each other... or lunch

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How many times have you returned from a night out, passed out from all the hardcore strategic schmoozing, only to wake up the next morning and find some random person’s black-text-on-white business card in your pocket? Did you ask yourself: “Who the hell is this from?” Or have you ever handed out your own business card for, ahem, personal reasons, and penned your digits in a decidedly laborious and revealing fashion? All this must end.

PeopleCards are small cards that advertise truth stranger than fiction: real people. These trading cards have debuted at grungy bus station terminals in San Francisco, so why not Detroit? Imagine your personal card as an 8-by-10 glossy / résumé / autobiography / superstahhh showcase minimized to the size of a business card. It really seems like the best and most efficient way to creatively market yourself as a hot commodity.

Pull together your most impressive stats – make it complete, with the lowdown on all the good and weird stuff that you always wanted to advertise. Then complete the questionnaire on PeopleCard's Web site (www.peoplecards.net) and mail a photograph to the company. PeopleCard selects a group of people for upcoming editions of the trading cards, which sell for $2.99 a pack (seven cards).

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