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Double dipping

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In case Carl’s teens haven’t started you dreaming about exploring the environs of Cass and Warren in Detroit this Friday, there’s more (too much, in fact) to wet your parched curiosity. The Film Studies Program makes Friday double-decker day at WSU when it offers a juicy talk, “Buñuel, Bataille and Buster, or the Secret Life of Things,” as the 2001 Dennis Turner Memorial Lecture, an annual affair that has invited the likes of avant-garde filmmakers Stan Brakhage and Abigail Child, among illustrious others, to divulge the workings of cinema art. This year, Luis Buñuel’s infamous surreal masterpiece, Un Chien Andalou, gets compared to the shattering work of French novelist-critic Georges Bataille, and to the silent comedies of Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd by James F. Lastra, associate professor of English, cinema and media studies at the University of Chicago. Sounds like an excellent adventure, but since it takes place from 3-5 p.m. (with reception to follow), it piggy-backs on the Y/X teen conference and turns anybody who wants to check out both Craig and Lastra into a bit of a juggler. Yet it can be done. Lastra’s talk will be in Room 3234 of the English Department at 51 W. Warren. And again, it’s free and open to all.

The Hot & the Bothered is edited by MT arts editor George Tysh. E-mail him at gtysh@metrotimes.com.

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