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Engler shares a WEENIE

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Michigan Gov. John Engler was one of three people to share the distinct dishonor of getting a WEENIE award last week from the Citizens Environment Alliance.

The award is issued annually to individuals and organizations deemed to have done the most harm to the environment during the previous year.

Engler, who narrowly missed receiving a WEENIE last year, again faced stiff competition in gaining the dubious distinction of having his name inscribed on the trophy a model of the Detroit incinerator.

According to a press release put out by the Alliance, which represents activists in Ontario and Southeast Michigan, Engler earned the award by becoming "the No. 1 enemy of Michigan’s environment, the public’s right to know, and its neighbours in Ontario."

Engler’s attempts last year to fight clean air standards that would reduce smog in both Michigan and southwestern Ontario were cited as a primary reason he received the award.

Sharing the dubious distinction with Engler were Norm Sterling, the Ontario Minister of the Environment, and his boss, Premier Mike Harris.

On the positive side, a number of environmental achievement awards were also presented during ceremonies held at the Windsor Press Club. Among those recognized for their efforts was Detroit’s Harold Stokes, who was recognized for "his lifelong devotion to environmental and social justice."

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