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Flint Eastwood premieres limited-edition merch to benefit teen LGBTQ center

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Local alternative babe Flint Eastwood, aka Jax Anderson, announced the release of a new, limited-edition merch line in a Facebook post this weekend.

The launch of the Choose Empathy line falls on the one-year anniversary of Flint Eastwood's 2017 debut EP, Broke Royalty. While Anderson’s discography goes back to 2013 with two EPs, Small Victories and Late Nights in Bolo Ties, Broke Royalty propelled Anderson into an extensive summer tour including stops at Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, and Electric Forest.

In the post announcing the line, Anderson reflects on the journey Broken Royalty has taken her on and why we should choose empathy. 

“At our core I feel like we all want the same things — to be loved, to be safe and taken care of, and to be understood,” she said. “One word has kind of become my mantra as a reminder to myself of what the core of Flint Eastwood is all about. Empathy.”

The new empathetic line offers a mug, t-shirt, pin, poster, and a camo fanny pack. All times range from $8 to $25.

A portion of the proceeds will support the Ruth Ellis Center, a residential safe space for runaway, homeless, and at-risk LGBTQ teens in Detroit. The community-based center specializes in providing youth with coping skills, “that will ensure successful living as a LGBTQ adult.

Whoa - it’s been a whole year since Broke Royalty was released. I feel like I could never say it enough - I appreciate y’all so much. FE couldn’t be what it is today without each & everyone of you showing up in so many ways. Thank you for being family. I’ve been reflecting a lot this week on where this EP/project has taken me - over oceans, across continents, & to so many places I never thought I’d go. I’m so unbelievably grateful to have gotten the chance to travel doing what I love & that I’ve been able to hear your stories both on the road or on the internet along the way. It’s crazy to me how connected we all are. At our core I feel like we all want the same things - to be loved, to be safe & taken care of, & to be understood. One word has kind of become my mantra as a reminder to myself of what the core of Flint Eastwood is all about. Empathy. There’s so much bullshit in the world, & sometimes it’s easy to forget that we can choose to be understanding - we can choose to love - we can choose to be empathetic. I feel like that word is starting point of so much good. I’m excited to announce the “Choose Empathy” limited merch release. This word has been such a comfort to me, & I hope it helps as a reminder to you. ————————— This year has also taught me so much about what it means to help up others moving forward. A portion of the proceeds of the Empathy merch will go to the Ruth Ellis Center for LGBTQ+ Youth in Detroit, MI. Thanks for listening y'all. (Link in bio)

A post shared by Flint Eastwood (@flinteastwood) on


“There’s so much bullshit in the world, and sometimes it’s easy to forget that we can choose to be understating — we can choose to love — we can choose to be empathetic,” Anderson said. “This year has also taught me so much about what it means to greater help up others moving forward.”

The limited edition merch can be purchased here



Miriam Marini is an editorial intern with the Metro Times. She is a sophomore at Wayne State University studying journalism and women’s studies.

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