Food & Drink

Food Stuff

by

Olde and new — Denny Walsh, owner of Ye Olde Wine Shoppe in Rochester Hills, is hosting a 20th anniversary strolling wine tasting at the Radisson-Kingsley Hotel in Bloomfield Hills. The tasting will feature Walsh's wine picks, including some old mainstays and some new favorites, encompassing more than 50 Californian, European and Australian reds and whites. The Matt Prentice Restaurant Group will be on hand, cooking up lavish food stations to harmonize with Denny's selections. At 6:30-8:30 p.m. Friday, May 18; reservations only; call 248-852-5533; $50 per person.

Recalling repeal — Though we're sure to hear about many parties celebrating the end of Prohibition over the next two years, the first of many may be from Eastown Distributors. Though the Volstead Act didn't officially end until December of 1933, the Highland Park-based, third-generation family-owned distributor is eager to promote its history of working with local charities, educating the public about alcohol, and, last but not least, delivering our fire water. Thanks, fellas.

Turning 20 — Remember 1987? Fat, not carbs, were the enemy. Chrysler was buying AMC instead of being sold. Lou Diamond Phillips was a star. A lot has changed, but the TCBY chain is still selling the flavor they introduced that year: White Chocolate Mousse. The chain is marking the anniversary with the introduction of live, active yogurt cultures to their frozen yogurt products. Have a taste at one of their Detroit-area locations.

 

Eat the Page

Jane and Michael Stern's earlier books explored the offbeat diners and barbecue joints that dot the landscape of our nation. In their latest, Roadfood Sandwiches: Recipes and Lore from Our Favorite Shops Coast to Coast (Houghton Mifflin, $14.95), they share recipes and origins of the sandwiches. From the mouthwatering Muffaletta on the cover, which inspired the term "Muffaletta diving," to Elvis' heart-stopping fried peanut butter-and-banana sandwich, to lobster rolls and Cuban sandwiches, this is a must-have cookbook and travel guide.

A Tasty Beverage

Always on the lookout for a spicy, refreshing drink to stand up to the highly seasoned barbecue that has suddenly become seasonal, we were knocked out by this Pepper-Mint Limeade. Stir the juice of four limes with a cup of sugar until it dissolves. Add two mint sprigs, mashing them with a wooden spoon to release the fragrant oils. Add 1/2 gallon of cold water and a fresh jalapeno, sliced thin. Let the mixture sit for about 8 hours. A splash of Bacardi won't hurt.

It Works

With beef prices that are as intimidating as the cost of a gallon of gas, the Jaccard meat tenderizer lets you enjoy less expensive and often more flavorful cuts of meat without breaking the bank. Used by restaurants for years, this device uses rows of thin stainless steel blades to penetrate the meat and break down the muscle tissues that make it tough. Merely put the meat on a cutting board and press the machine over the top of the meat. For cuts of meat thicker than 1 inch, turn the meat over and pierce the other side too. It's made in the USA, and it's dishwasher safe.

Know of any new restaurants, special dinners or food-related events? Let us know. Send materials two weeks in advance to mjackman@metrotimes.com.

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