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Heron takes top perch

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As the resident office sage, W. Kim Heron has been the glue that's held together Metro Times often-shifting editorial department for the past nine years. He now takes over as editor of Detroit's largest alt-weekly. (Former editor Ric Bohy resigned earlier this month.)

Originally from Amherstburg, Ontario, Heron came to Detroit at 11, attending Cass Tech and then pursuing journalism at Michigan State University. He worked for the Detroit Free Press from 1979 to 1995, before coming to Metro Times as managing editor in 1997, when, ironically, he thought he was getting out of the newspaper business. He also plays bongos and other drums, sang (for several seconds) on a Was Not Was album, juggles, is known for his encyclopedic knowledge of obscure facts and has had a 17-year run at WDET-FM with his weekly jazz show, The Kim Heron Program.

"Detroit is many things, a troubled, exciting, vibrant community, and Metro Times has always wanted to reflect that. I'm excited about taking the leadership position with the very talented staff here, and addressing those realities," Heron says.

"Kim has had a huge hand in keeping our editorial staff together through many changes over the past few years," says Publisher Lisa Rudy. "He has demonstrated unwavering integrity and has a truly honest work ethic. Kim takes a very insightful and creative approach to the content of our paper."

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