Arts & Culture » Culture

July 23-29, 2003

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24 THU • COMEDY Larry Campbell — You just want to give him a bear hug. Former member of Detroit’s Second City and current co-star on ABC’s “According to Jim,” Larry Joe Campbell is just adorable. He returns to Detroit with his one-man show, “Terry vs. the Towel Lady,” the story of a social outcast struggling through life, a funny account highlighting Campbell’s versatile character-playing and comedic timing. See it at Planet Ant Theatre (2357 Caniff, Hamtramck). Call 313-365-4948 for more information.

 

25 FRI • ART “Feel the Power of Pointillism”/True Colors Art Fund Benefit — Take a second look. At close range, a Pointillistic painting may look like nothing more than a series of dots, but if you step away, a picture comes into view. And the folks at the True Colors Art Fund believe the big picture — the importance of art education — may not always be seen up close. But once a child has been given the room to create, there is no telling what sort of beauty will come of it. Dedicated to providing art scholarships and grants to high school and college students and creating a safe and creative environment for artistic youths, the True Colors Art Fund has organized the “Feel the Power of Pointillism” exhibit/sale as a fundraiser to help keep the arts alive in southeastern Michigan. Arts-related charities will receive 75 percent of all proceeds. At the Gallery Sol (71 N. Main, Mt. Clemens). Call 586-612-9765 for more information.

 

25 FRI • THEATER Under the Yum Yum Tree — Talk about being in the wrong place at the right time. Lawrence Roman’s classic romantic comedy about a meddling landlord and a progressive young tenant is as sweet as it is silly. Set in 1962, the story has recent college graduate, Robin Austin, moving into her first apartment. When she and her fiance Dave decide to test their compatibility by moving in together, the strange times ensue. At Broadway Onstage (21517 Kelly Road, Eastpointe). Call 586-771-6333 for show times.

 

26 SAT • VARIETY/BENEFIT The Fifth Estate — Since 1965, Detroit’s own Fifth Estate has been one journal that hasn’t stopped flipping off authority, while being a constant source of info, contacts and inspiration in the struggle against idiocy and repression (which always go hand in hand). On Saturday, our favorite anarchists (the folks who gave us recipes on how to cook and eat the rich) will be raising funds to keep the presses rolling and the home fires burning. The program features a silent auction, songs by Alan Franklin and Marie Mason, spoken-word performances by William Boyer and Sunfrog, and a DIY Revolutionary Dance Party (by the gang that practically invented DIY). If you’ve got $5-$50 to contribute (tax-deductible) to the newspaper that fought the law without the law winning, bring it on down to the First Unitarian Universalist Church (4605 Cass at Forest, Detroit — enter through the red door on Forest), 8 p.m.-midnight. We mean it, man!

 

28 MON • COMEDY Jackie Mason — Yes, the king of the one-liners is still kicking. Well, kicking and jabbing to be exact. With no topic too sacred, Jackie Mason has made a living from finding the humor in everyday life. And his latest litany of laughs, “Prune Danish,” is a scathing take on current events that will keep folks young and old laughing til their sides ache. Check it out at the Second City (2301 Woodward Ave., Detroit). Call 313-965-2222 or visit www.secondcity.com for more information. Runs through Aug. 10.

 

29 TUE • MUSIC Roxy Music — Suave and sexy, Roxy Music is as much a work of art as it is a band. With his glammed-out sophisticate ethos and milky voice, lead singer Brian Ferry has brought a certain classiness to rock ’n’ roll that has since been unmatched. And while they are known for older classics such as “Pyjamarama” and “More Than This,” Roxy Music is still as relevant as ever. Check them out at DTE (Sashabaw Road off I-75, Clarkston). Call 248-645-6666 for tickets.

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