Arts & Culture » Culture

N&D Center

WEDNESDAY•23•THEATER

Charlotte’s Web

E.B. White was something of a miracle worker; as a children’s book author he managed to not only entertain the masses of eager new readers, but to teach them important lessons about life along the way. One of his most beloved tales, Charlotte’s Web is a beautiful story about the circle of life and how, even as youngsters, we must learn to cope with loss. Take the kids to see the stage production of the White classic at the Hilberry Theatre (4743 Cass Ave., Detroit); call 313-577-2972 for ticket information and show times. Runs through July 10.

THURSDAY & SATURDAY•24, 26 and 27•MUSIC

Kevin K.

Filthy glam: The contradiction in terms that best describes rock ’n’ roller Kevin K. One part fancy-pants stage whore, one part crunchy guitar player, this underground punk has lived a road-weary existence, jamming with all kinds of folks from the punk/glam ilk. An honorary Detroiter if measured by musical spirit and chutzpah, Kevin K. is back in town to deliver a musical trifecta that just might blow the eyeliner right off your face. Check it out: Thursday, June 24, at the Lager House (1254 Michigan Ave., Detroit) with the Avatars and the Tough & Lovely; Saturday, June 26, at Small’s (10339 Conant, Hamtramck) with the Coronados and Sissy; and on Sunday, spend a rock ’n’ roll sabbath with K. at the Elbow Room (6 S. Washington St., Ypsilanti) with the High Rollers, the Scars and the Tough & Lovely.

FRIDAY•25•COMEDY

Lily Tomlin

If Lily Tomlin’s lovable character Ernestine, the gossipy telephone operator, found out that this top-rate comedy act was coming to town, her signature snorts and chortles would fill the room! Tomlin, a Detroit native, will return to the Great Lake State to spread a thick helping of hilarity to the Ann Arbor Summer Festival with her unique brand of stand-up and sketch comedy. Laugh, laugh, laugh at Hill Auditorium (825 N. University, Ann Arbor); call 734-763-8587 for ticket information.

FRIDAY•25•ART

Father & Son: A Retrospective Portrait Exhibition

Seventy-five years of portraiture make up this father/son installation, and one thing is for sure — talent runs in the family. For the first time, artist Joseph Maniscalco and his gifted son (gallery owner, host of WTVS’s "Art Beat," and artist) Robert Maniscalco will be showing their artwork side by side. Their emotive and austere portraits are a beautiful expression of human emotion. See the Maniscalco’s masterpieces at the Maniscalco Gallery (17728 Mack Ave., Grosse Pointe); call 313-886-2993 for more information. Opening reception is Friday, June 25 from 6-9 p.m. Exhibit ends July 31.

FRIDAY•25•MUSIC

Elements Quartet Snapshots

The Great Lakes Chamber Music Festival continues its amazing summer schedule with the Elements String Quartet’s "Snapshots" — a multimedia work described by The Washington Post as "the liveliest new-music concert … heard in ages." Sixteen composers working in genres from classical to film music to jazz — including David Del Tredici and Regina Carter — contribute works inspired by personal photos which are projected during the show. At 8 p.m., at the State Theatre (2115 Woodward Ave., Detroit); call 313-961-5450 for more information. Sponsored by Metro Times and Synergy Detroit, a nonprofit group that combats the negative stereotypes of urban living. For an article about Elements and "Snapshots," see metrotimes.com.

FRIDAY•25•ART

Yousuf Karsh: Industrial Portraits featuring Ford of Canada, Windsor, 1951

It was 1951 when photographer Yousuf Karsh came to Windsor to photograph the men on the Ford assembly line, foundry and the trade school in Windsor. The resultant photographs were dark, grisly and hauntingly beautiful and captured the wholesome reality that was blue-collar living in the midst of 1950s industrialism. See these rarely seen photographs at the Art Gallery of Windsor (401 Riverside Dr., Windsor); call 519-977-0013 for more information. Runs until August 29.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY•25-27•FILM

The Bank Dick and My Little Chickadee

Deacon of the drink, W.C. Fields never met a bottle of booze he didn’t like; in fact, the apple-nosed entertainer made an entire career out of his affinity for the sauce. This week, audiences can enjoy a hearty helping of Fields’ signature "al-kee-haul"-addled, female-ogling humor with a double feature of two of his most famous flicks: See The Bank Dick and My Little Chickadee at the Redford Theatre (17360 Lahser, Detroit) on Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., with a Saturday matinee at 2 p.m. Call 313-383-0133 for ticket info.

SATURDAY•26•ISSUES & LEARNING/ FILM

GLBT Film Fest

Like it or not, the issue of gay and lesbian equity is at the forefront of today’s political agenda. That’s why the folks at the First Unitarian-Universalist Church of Detroit are proud to present the GLBT (Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgendered) Film Fest, a screening of three films that focus on different aspects of gay and lesbian life. The films, The Celluloid Closet, Trembling Before G*d and Before Stonewall will be followed by brief lectures and discussions. At the First Unitarian-Universalist Church of Detroit (4605 Cass Ave., Detroit); call 313-833-9107 for more information.

ONGOING•ART

Eric Mesko: Tough Times in the USA

If you can afford to put some gas in your tank, why not take a ride on over to the Zeitgeist Gallery in Detroit to see Eric Mesko’s latest installation Tough Times in the USA, a politically-charged art exhibit that uses nostalgia and ironic realism to make a point. Mesko’s stark humor and candidness explore the social and political implications of the war in Iraq and other issues that Americans must deal with on a daily basis. At the Zeitgeist Gallery (2661 Michigan Ave., Detroit); call 313-965-9192 for more information. Ends July 24.

ONGOING•ART

Disco: A Decade of Saturday Nights

It’s all about the glamour: the clothes, the friends, the drugs and the sex. Add a touch of history and a gallery-type setting and you’ve got Disco: A Decade of Saturday Nights. Visitors will get an overview of the underground origins and excesses of the faddish scene that fairly defined the 1970s with this six-part installation that covers everything from disco music to the clothes to the "it" club, NYC’s Studio 54. At the Henry Ford Museum (20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn); call 313-271-1620 for more information. Ends September 15.

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