Arts & Culture » Culture

Night and Day

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WEDNESDAY • 2
JAYNE MANSFIELD DOUBLE FEATURE
HERE THEY ARE ...

Often referred to as the poor man's Marilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield had the busty blond bombshell role down to a science. A science that seemed to mainly involve "accidental" exposure of her breasts that kept her (them?) in the public eye long after her roles in Hollywood had dried up. The twins being shown at this, eh-hem, huge double feature may be less titillating, but are no less entertaining — The Girl Can't Help It, Jayne's first starring roll and the first rock 'n' roll musical, and the lesser-known B-movie thriller Dog Eat Dog. Hosted by local rapper esQuire, the movies roll at dusk at Peck Park located at the corner of Kirby and Beaubien in Detroit's midtown. Admission is free, but make sure to bring a blanket. Rain date is Thursday, July 3.

WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY • 2-5
16TH ANNUAL SALUTE TO AMERICA
OOOH AND AHHH

It wouldn't be Fourth of July weekend without some good, old-fashioned fireworks. For a full injection of national pride, trot down to America's History Attraction and catch a patriotic concert by the Detroit Symphony Orchestra along with the fireworks, all amid the historic buildings of Greenfield Village. The orchestra will perform a selection of American standards before the fireworks display, which is choreographed to Tchaikovsky's 1812 Overture and complemented by live canon fire (oh boy!). Nineteenth century lawn games and pre-concert musical entertainment will precede the DSO set. Gates open at 6 p.m. at Greenfield Village, 20900 Oakwood Blvd., Dearborn; 313-982-6001; thehenryford.org.

THURSDAY • 3
THE DIALS CD RELEASE PARTY
CHICK POWER POP

Any time a chick dons a guitar or grabs a mic, the word "girl" has to be overplayed. If it's not "girl power," it's "girl punk" or, at the very least, "girl group." Yawn. And there's the subtext with the word "girl" that says they can't be better than boys. With three lovely ladies up front and a lone dude manning the tubs, this Chicago group has had its share of gender-based descriptions. If you remove sex from the discussion (but who'd do that?), you could say that the Dials offer jaw-dropping, punk-inspired power pop. They're in town for the Detroit release of their second full-length, Amoeba Amore. With Coronados and the Dial Tones at the Belmont, 10215 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-871-1966; thebelmontbar.com.

THURSDAY • 3
KODE9
DUBSTEP SUPERSTAR

The evolution of house music in Britain, known as the UK garage movement, spawned several different subgenres of electronic — grime, 2-step, speed garage and dubstep to name a few. A maverick originator of dubstep, Kode9's early DJ career in Scotland eventually led him to London where he has become a marquee name in the electronic world. His minimalist sound features the dark tones and heavy bass that've become synonymous with dubstep. And if the differences between dubstep and, well, pretty much any other house music seem too subtle to grasp, just know it really doesn't matter as long as you keep up the shimmy. With Nospectacle at the Eagle Theatre, 15 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248-858-9333; $10; all ages.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY • 4-6
NEW GREE
ROCK BAND DANCE?

It might be better to think of New York-based dance collective Modern Garage Movement as a garage rock band than as a dance troupe — especially if the word dance conjures up visions of pink tutus and faceless petite automatons twirling in unison. From rehearsals in a one-car garage in 2005, this experimental dance project has evolved into a cross-country tour that can take place anywhere, at anytime. With eyes closed, the dancers of MGM move through the varying landscapes of their performance spaces, utilizing and exploiting whatever their setting provides for them. Sounds kinda trippy. At the UFO Factory (1345 Division St., Ste. 101, Detroit; 248-632-3670) on July 4, at Kt and Garrett's Pasture (3410 Farnsworth St., Detroit) on July 5, and with Eagleager and Heart the Band at the Bohemian National Home (3009 Tillman, Detroit; 313-737-6606) on July 6.

FRIDAY • 4
ANTHONY HAMILTON
SOUL-SEARCHIN'

Frequently compared to Bobby Womack and Al Green, Anthony Hamilton has finally donned the mantle of this generation's soul idol. Hamilton's rise was slow, despite a critic's darling status — he spent years singing backup for bigger names and watching record labels fold before his albums were released. But now he's a somebody in contemporary R&B, and might well be on his way to becoming a household name. He even had a cameo in the film American Gangster, as well as the lead single on the soundtrack. His four full-lengths all represent the best of the Southern soul tradition with songs about heartbreak, hard times and gettin' by sung in a sexy and smoldering voice. At 8 p.m. with Anthony David at Chene Park, 2600 E. Atwater St., Detroit; 313-393-0292; cheneparkdetroit.com.

SATURDAY • 5
CANJA RAVE
CHICKEN SOUP FOR THE ROCKER'S SOUL

Translated into English, Canja Rave means chicken soup rave. Huh? That's right. But don't let this Brazilian garage rock duo's odd moniker put you off. Its name represents an abrupt mood shift from, say, wanting to lay in bed and nurse a hangover — some chicken soup, maybe? — to wanting to hit the night all over again. It's a feeling we can all relate to, no? Headlining a CityFest afterparty that also features local acts Sey Lui, the Directions (Siddhartha's new incarnation!) and Duende! at the Corktown Tavern, 1716, Michigan Ave., Detroit; 313-964-5103; corktowntavern.com.

SATURDAY • 5
RECYCLE + FREECYCLE
REUSE YOUR JUNK

It's a known and pathetic truth that Americans have a larger ecological footprint than any other people on the planet. We consume more resources — and waste more — than we need. An easy and fun way to reduce the amount of waste in the world is to take advantage of the second R in the familiar environmental mantra. The Glass Academy is giving our prodigal asses the chance to offer up our old junk for reuse while browsing other people's junk for something we may need. The idea is so obviously great, eh? At the Glass Academy, 25331 Trowbridge, Dearborn; 313-561-4527; glassacademy.com.

SATURDAY • 5
FIFTH OF JULY PUNKFEST
CELEBRATE DEFIANCE

A good Independence Day celebration might involve grilling, fireworks and some rebellious 'tude — we are commemorating the ultimate "fuck you" that our forefathers gave to jolly old England, right? The Fifth of July Punkfest will feature all of the aforementioned elements for the perfect slamfest with rebel spirit in Detroit punk rock bands the Escapades, Satan's Toilet, Toxic Shock Syndrome, Jesus Chainsaw Massacre, J Rugs, Circus Boy and the fabulous Bootsy X & the New Lovemasters. Rock and Rummage will also be in attendance. The free party kicks off at 7 p.m. at the Old Miami, 3930 Cass Ave.; Detroit; 313-831-3830.

MONDAY • 7
WOLF PARADE
CATCH THE HYPE

Indie-minded critics have been squirming in their down-dressed garb for the release of Wolf Parade's second album, the follow-up to their much-adored 2005 debut Apologies to the Queen Mary. Now that At Mt. Zoomer has finally hit the streets, what's the consensus? Well, the word "classic" has actually been tossed about a little too liberally. It seems the Canadian group has become darker and deeper, more experimental and developed — there's even an eleven-minute tune included. Talk about your "classic." With the Listening Party at the Crofoot, 1 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248-858-9333; thecrofoot.com; $15; all ages.

TUESDAY • 8
LEE "SCRATCH" PERRY
THE DUBBEST

With a new CD co-produced by Andrew W.K set to drop next month (Repentance on Narnack Records, with guest artists including Moby and pornster Sasha Grey), the septuagenarian madman who pioneered reggae and dub could be on the threshold of a late-career renaissance. Or at least a whole new audience. Jamaican-born Perry has produced artists from Bob Marley to the Clash and the Beastie Boys, co-wrote the reggae classic "Police and Thieves" and has recorded lots of shoulda-been-classics, such as a wonderful paean to groovin' in a straight jacket. With a backstory that includes insisting that he started the fire that burned his Black Art studio to the ground, he may have sung that one from experience. 8 p.m. at the Eagle Theatre, 15 S. Saginaw, Pontiac; 248-858-9333; $25.

ONGOING
YOUR TOWN TOMORROW: PHOTOGRAPHS BY CORINE SMITH
A RURAL DETROIT

The title of this exhibition is lifted from a Coleman Young quote describing Detroit as a warning that cities are in trouble and the country should prepare for a potential "urban meltdown." While that message does little to make one hopeful for Detroit (or any city, for that matter), Corine Smith's photographs show how a Detroit of tomorrow could be reconstituted into a model for trumping urban decay rather than succumbing to it even further. The city's ever-increasing green spaces are captured in the photographs in a way that offers hope for a new city, rather than despair for the old. Through July 31, at Design 99, 10022 Joseph Campau, Hamtramck; 313-576-6941; visitdesign99.com.

ONGOING
FILL THE FRAME
CREATIVITY CONFINED

This juried exhibit had one simple criterion — all works must appear in a single 14-inch-by-21-inch frame supplied by the gallery. While the frame set a boundary and confined the artists' work, the artists were free to fill it in any way they chose. As a result, this exhibit offers a vast array of styles, subject matters and mediums within identical trappings. It's creativity, but with rules. Sound like fun? Through July 25, at the Lawrence Street Gallery, 22620 Woodward Ave., Ferndale; 248-544-0394; lawrencestreetgallery.com.

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