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What, no musicals? — To answer our own question, the answer is, thankfully, “no.” The Michigan Coalition for Human Rights is offering a fluff-free film series for the serious-minded. Or, as they put it, “A rare opportunity to experience a powerful film series and participate in thoughtful discussion following each and meet activists from local organizations.” The series kicks off at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15, with a showing of Earth on the Edge, a film by journalist Bill Moyers. The piece looks at the degree to which this planet is being abused, as well as the efforts of people around the globe “pioneering sustainable solutions to ecological problems.” We can tell you that if Moyers is involved, it’s gotta be good. Showings are at St. John Episcopal Church, 26998 Woodward Ave., Royal Oak. Cost is $5. For more info about this and other shows in the series visit mchr.org or phone 313-874-2624.

Holy roiler — For those who fear that all Bible-toters are raving right-wingers, the good news is that you’re wrong. Episcopal Bishop John Shelby Spong, the controversial author of Rescuing the Bible from Fundamentalism and 14 other books, is proof of that. He’ll speak at 6:30 p.m., Feb. 15, at Christ Church Grosse Pointe, 61 Grosse Pointe Blvd., Grosse Pointe Farms; 313-885-4841.

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