Samurai sword-wielding girlfriend attacks Ypsilanti man for not buying pot for her, police say

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An Ypsilanti man told police he was attacked by his samurai sword-wielding girlfriend because he didn’t buy marijuana for her.

Neil Patrick Wasinski, 28, who is identified as a woman in police records, was charged with several counts, including assault with intent to murder, on Jan. 18, two days after police say she stabbed her boyfriend with a 21-inch sword in her apartment. 

Details of the attack were spelled out in a police report obtained by MLive.



According to the 23-year-old victim, Wasinski punched his ribcage, stabbed him with the sword and chased him through a parking lot.

Police found the vicim holding a bloody towel to several stab wounds. He told officers that Wasinski was angry because he didn’t buy pot for her.



The victim was in critical condition with a collapsed lung at St. Joseph Hospital. He has since recovered.

Police spotted Wasinski in her apartment, where she refused to open the door and told officers to “please go away,” according to the report. After police entered the apartment with a master key, Wasinski struggled with officers and spit on one of them, police said.

Inside the apartment was an unsheathed, blood-stained katana, according to police.

Wasinksi eventually told police she couldn’t remember the attack because she was intoxicated.

Wasinksi is scheduled to be sentenced on March 27 in Washtenaw County Court. She faces up to four years in prison.

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