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Slammin’

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“Long-haired & loopy soul-singing, fiddle-playing, rifle-shooting, whiskey-drinking, horse-riding, drum-playing muses on motorcycles.”

This description (from a purported “bio”) projects images of unbridled joie de vivre upon the mind’s movie screen, preparing us just a little for the arrival of the Kalamazoo Slam Team, poets with a wild streak, word-wrasslers and vowel combustors who’ll take over the premises of Hamtramck’s Urban Break Coffee House on Monday, July 16 as the next installment of the Third Monday Spoken Word Series.

Hosted by Scott Klein, the once-a-month event brings formidable crews to the poetic rescue, the featured group doing two sets (“each preceded by a tight, no b.s. round of open mic”) and giving folks a thick slice of invention from one land of lit or another (one previous session featured Detroit Slam Teamsters Kim Koby and Matthew Scott, and another Plymouth’s Jeffree Paul St. John and Erik Daniel).

Urban Break Coffee House is at 10020 Joseph Campau in Hamtramck (two blocks south of Caniff, adjacent to Pope Park) — call 313-872-1210. Things get started at 8 p.m., with admission at $3 to the always-packed poetastefest.

Hit that refrain:

“Long-haired & loopy soul-singing, fiddle-playing, rifle-shooting, whiskey-drinking, horse-riding, drum-playing muses on motorcycles.”

The Hot & the Bothered is edited by MT arts editor George Tysh. E-mail him at gtysh@metrotimes.com.

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