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For a century and half, Tequila Herradura has been crafting tequilas with a balance of respect for traditional processes paired with industry-leading innovation from the last true tequila-producing hacienda on the planet; making it a true piece of Mexico's cultural fabric. Day of the Dead is a tradition born in Mexico, that in 2008 was included on UNESCO's list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Origins of this Celebration
In pre-Hispanic times, the cult of death was one of the basic elements of Mexico’s culture. Day of the Dead is the indigenous vision that honors the memory and soul of passed loved ones, who return home on this annual celebration to join in spirit with the living, observed with rituals including food offerings displayed on an altar. To this day, this celebration continues with one same principle - bringing families together to welcome loved ones who return from beyond.

The Altars
The altar is placed in a room, displayed on a table or shelf, built with various levels representing the strata of existence. The most common is the two-tiered altar, which represents heaven and earth. The offerings, or “ofrendas,” must contain a series of elements and symbols that invite the spirit to visit. Among the most traditional elements displayed include images of the deceased, papel picado (a decorative craft made by cutting elaborate designs into sheets of tissue paper), candles, water, flowers, sugar skulls, personal objects, food, bread and alcohol - in most cases tequila. Likely their loved ones’ favorite food and tequila to show their memory and appreciation of their loved one.

The Celebration
The night of November 1st to November 2nd, families and friends gather to share food and toast the memory of loved ones. Today in the US we find that many love the vibrant nature of the colors, sugar skulls, and perceived connection to Halloween. Many people host light-hearted celebrations of their own to bring this to life for friends and family. Even though the history and traditional celebrations may not have reached the US consumers broadly, it is great to see the Mexican culture live and breathe into new US customs.

From Casa Herradura in Amatitan Mexico, across Mexico, and now to the celebrations in the U.S., Tequila Herradura toasts to the families that continue to celebrate and pay respect to the traditions and legacies that leave a mark on new generations to come. This wouldn’t be a celebration without some authentic Tequila and there’s very few brands that are as authentic and intertwined with Mexico’s history as Tequila Herradura, a brand that is celebrating 150 years in the making this year. Toast Day of the Dead the traditional way with a neat Tequila Herradura Reposado served in a rocks glass, or dial up the moment with a vibrant cocktail such as the traditional el Duelo.

More about Tequila Herradura
Tequila Herradura is renowned for being the tequila industry’s foremost innovator for more than five generations, credited with the introduction of the Reposado and Extra-Añejo categories. The brand continues to use traditional methods, such as slowly cooking the agave hearts in clay ovens and using natural fermentation with airborne wild yeast created by the agave plantations and fruit trees surrounding the Hacienda. Casa Herradura integrates sustainable practices in many facets of the tequila production process to reduce its environmental footprint.

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