Arts & Culture » Culture

War paint

comment
Getting to glamour extremes calls for heavy-duty cosmetic artillery. That’s why companies such as New York City’s Manic Panic are still around. For “dyehards” only, the uncalled-for hair colors in the Manic Panic line are still stylin’ staples in the medicine cabinets of the truly adventurous. Because of this company, various shades of shocking red, yellow, green, orange, purple, blue and pink have shown up on heads everywhere, including some of the best-known rock stars of the past two decades. Among the wild hair color hall-of-famers on the MP Web site are Cyndi Lauper, the Lunachicks, a hairdresser and an unidentified black lab with a red Mohawk. There’s something for everyone in their ever-growing rainbow of dyes and makeup. False lashes, lipsticks, body glitter, clip-on hair extensions, creams, powders, sticks, wigs and more add additional depth to this unconventional color roster. Manic Panic cream and gel semipermanent hair dyes come in Cotton Candy Pink, Deadly Nightshade, Infra Red, Purple Haze, Green Envy, Electric Sunshine and many others. They sell for about $12 per tube or jar and are widely available in hip urban stores. Visit www.manicpanic.com for more details. The Web site also offers information on new products and advice on how to use Manic Panic dyes. Norene Cashen pays attention here every other week. E-mail letters@metrotimes.com

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.