Filipino Cuisine to Debut at Pop-Up

comment

Though activity seemed to drop off a bit over the winter, pop-ups seem to be taking off again, with plenty of new entries testing out their dining concepts. Among them is Sarap, which means “delicious” in Tagalog, the official language of the Philippines. Co-founded by Dorothy Hernandez, a native of Chicago who moved to Detroit for work, Sarap is her interpretation of the classic Filipino dishes her mother made. After moving to Detroit, Hernandez became friends with Jake Williams, who works as the Cooking Matters coordinator for Gleaners Food Bank. The pair noticed a distinct lack of Filipino food in metro Detroit and decided it would be fun to bring their spin on the protein-friendly Asian cuisine to our doorstep.

Hernandez quips that Filipino food is the ultimate fusion food, as it’s a combination of Spanish, Malay, Chinese and tropical cuisines. Sure, in the Philippines you’ll find traditional pancit (noodles) with shrimp, but you’ll be just as likely to find a Filipino spin on paella. Similarly, Hernandez and Williams intend to present traditional flavors, but also elevate and reinterpret them in exciting ways.

A longtime supporter of the Detroit culinary scene, Dave Mancini, owner and chef at Supino in Eastern Market, is lending his space for Sarap’s first Detroit pop-up. Two seatings, one at 5 p.m. and one at 8 p.m. are available on Sunday, June 22. See sarapdetroit.com for more information and to make reservations.


We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.