Crane Wives with The Accidentals at the Magic Stick

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The Crane Wives don’t ever seem to put on a bad show.

On Thursday night at the Magic Stick, they jammed out in front of an eager audience, cementing the notion that they are one of Michigan’s most proficient bands.
However, even though the Crane Wives put on a solid show in their Detroit debut (they’ve played Smalls in Hamtramck a few times, but this was their first show in the city proper), one of the most pleasant surprises of the evening was one of the opening bands.



The Accidentals, a duo (touring as a trio with Michael Dause on drums) made up of Kate Larson, 18, and Savannah Buist, 19, took the stage to a somewhat disinterested crowd. However, it only took the teenagers about half a song to capture the attention of everyone in the room.

The two girls from Traverse City traded instruments back and forth- a cello here, a violin there. Here, you take this electric guitar, I’ll play bass for this one. They strummed, cut, slapped and picked strings, bringing a youthful exuberance that the crowd ate up.



Even the headliners were impressed.

“They’re really great, aren’t they,” Emilee Petersmark, guitarist and vocalist for the Crane Wives asked after a few songs.

With the exception of playing at a TEDx event and a charity show at the Hard Rock, this was The Accidentals’ first show in Detroit.

But judging by the crowd’s reaction, it won’t be their last.

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