Build a parade float, smite the Nain Rouge

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You've heard of the Nain Rouge, right? He's a crimson little imp that's been accused of wreaking havoc and causing turmoil in the city of Detroit since about, oh, 1701. 

Since 2010 Detroiters have thrown an annual parade to scare away the ugly red dwarf and this year will be no different. Well, it'll be a little different. This year the organizers behind the Marche du Nain Rouge are asking the community to build floats for the parade.



Communities like Morningside, Warrendale, West Village, and Rosedale Park are asked to band together to construct floats that will help win these neighborhoods cash prizes. The money will go toward community improvements. Two runners-up will receive $250 and the best community float will be awarded $500.

Two float workshops will be held prior to the parade to help get the community's floats in shape. The first will take place on from 3-5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 7 at the Caribbean Mardi Gras Productions studio at 6911 East Lafayette on the Eastside. The second from 3-5 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 21 at OmniCorp Detroit,1501 Division St. in Eastern Market.



The annual Marche du Nain Rouge takes place on March 22. It starts at 1 p.m. and leaves from the Traffic Jam and Snug parking lot on Canfield and and Second in Cass Corridor. 

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