Detroit schools lag behind national average in reading and math, report says

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A 2007 campaign for Detroit Public Schools. - PHOTO VIA FLICKR USER LAUREN
  • Photo via Flickr user Lauren
  • A 2007 campaign for Detroit Public Schools.
The National Assessment of Educational Progress released the Nation's Report Card Wednesday, and it looks like both Detroit and Michigan certainly have "room for improvement."

The results come from an NAEP test issued earlier to 279,000 fourth-graders and 273,000 eighth-graders earlier this year, MLive.com reports. According to the results, Michigan students scored lower than the national average in all categories with the exception of 8th-grade reading. 



Overall for Michigan 4th graders, only 34 percent scored "proficient" or "advanced" in math. Only 29 percent scored "proficient" or "advanced" in reading. 

For Michigan 8th graders, 29 percent scored "proficient" or "advanced" in math. They scored 32 percent "proficient" or "advanced" in reading, which is near the national average.



Detroit students fared worse. For Detroit 4th graders, only 5 percent scored "proficient" in math. Only 6 percent scored "proficient" in reading. 

For Detroit 8th graders, only 4 percent scored "proficient" in math. Only 7 percent scored "proficient" in reading.

As MLive notes, Gov. Rick Snyder is pushing to reconfigure Detroit Public Schools, a plan that would create a new district and inject an additional $1,100 per student.

But what the report does not address is the fact that a student's success is based on more than just the resources available in the classroom.

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