Detroiters are meeting to discuss possible livestock ordinance

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An old urban farm in Detroit ran by the Ferguson Academy for Young Women - FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS, VIA USER GREEN MAP SYSTEMS
  • Flickr Creative Commons, via user Green Map Systems
  • An old urban farm in Detroit ran by the Ferguson Academy for Young Women
Last year, we wrote about a possible proposed ordinance to overturn Detroit's increasingly enforced ban on livestock. 

WJBK checked in with city councilman James Tate, who says progress is being made on the ordinance. He says the driving force is not just public support for raising farm animals in the city, but also an opportunity to reclaim vacant lots.



"We started receiving a number of calls, a number of interactions, from individuals who either had them or who are interested in having them, and we're talking about folks who have been in the city for years, but also some folks who are moving in as well. So, it's a mixture," he told WJBK-TV. "That's the beauty of the city of Detroit. We have 140 square miles and we have just such a diversity within our neighborhoods that we can do a lot of different things."

Tate added that the types of livestock being considered are bees, goats, rabbits, and chickens.



Anyone interested in learning more about the proposed ordinance is invited to a meeting 6 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 18 at Greater Grace Temple, 23500 West 7 Mile Rd., Detroit. 

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