Jury awards $5 million after woman killed in Troy by SMART bus

by

comment
Sally LaMay. - PHOTO COURTESY OF FIEGER LAW.
  • Photo courtesy of Fieger Law.
  • Sally LaMay.

An Oakland County jury awarded $5 million Tuesday to the family of Sally LaMay, who was struck and killed by a SMART bus in Troy.

LaMay, 37, died Nov. 25, 2014 at Maplelawn and Crooks while walking in the crosswalk on a green light when a bus making a left-hand turn ran her over, according to Southfield-based attorney Geoffrey Fieger, who represents LaMay's family. 



A video from the bus shows LaMay attempting to run away, according to Fieger. The 37-year-old is survived by two children, Julian and Mekenna. 

"At trial the SMART bus company took the offensive position that Sally did not suffer any pain while the bus tore her apart," Fieger says in a statement. "The jury disagreed. The verdict was returned after a weeklong trial. The jury deliberated only two hours." 



The verdict amount is the highest of the year in Oakland County, according to Fieger's office. The trial was held before Oakland County Circuit Judge Nanci Grant. 

The driver of the bus, James Maholmes, was charged with a moving violation causing death. According to The Detroit News, Maholmes was fired from SMART and then dismissed from the case prior to trial — but died Jan. 5. 

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.