Detroit FBI spearheads crisis drill scheduled for Wayne State University tomorrow

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MT FILE PHOTO
  • MT file photo

Wayne State University is the latest campus to implement a crisis training in wake of the recent increase of school shootings. The latest in large-scale training exercises are scheduled to take place Thursday, May 3.

The simulation will prepare students and staff for a variety of active shooter and terrorist attack scenarios which will include simulated gunshots and explosions. Training efforts will be coordinated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as well as WSU Police chief Tony Holt.



Law enforcement, fire, EMS, tactical response units, as well as several police agencies will be present throughout campus and the surrounding areas along Warren Ave., Cass Ave., and Anthony Wayne Drive, all of which will require closure between 7 a.m. and 3 p.m. between W. Hancock to W. Warren.

From 6 a.m. until 4 p.m., several campus buildings will remain closed for the duration of the drill including Science Hall, Chemistry, State Hall, Life Sciences, Science and Engineering Library, and Linsell House. Parking lots Lot 54, Lot 53, and Lot 60 will also be inaccessible.

Tom Reynolds of the WSU communications office told Metro Times that the local authorities have been alerting the surrounding neighborhoods in advance of the drill as to avoid confusion or panic.

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