Kwame and Carlita Kilpatrick have quietly divorced

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PATRICIA MARKS / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
  • Patricia Marks / Shutterstock.com

Former Detroit mayor Kwame Kilpatrick and his wife Carlita have quietly divorced, according to a Facebook message posted by Kilpatrick on Wednesday.

"Honestly, I loss [sic] my marriage on January 24, 2008," Kilpatrick wrote, in reference to the day his affair with chief of staff Christine Beatty became public. "Certainly it languish and limp along for 10-years before the divorce was final... but the marriage was over that day."



The marriage didn't formally end until this year. According to reporting by The Detroit News, Kilpatrick filed a divorce petition in February, and Judge Barbara Hatfield ordered the marriage dissolved on July 23. The couple had been married since Sept. 9, 1995 and separated since Jan. 24, 2015.

In 2013, Kilpatrick was convicted of 24 felony counts for extortion, bribery, conspiracy, and fraud while in office. He was sentenced to 28 years in prison, and is currently being held in the same New Jersey prison as the notorious "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli. Kilpatrick has asked President Donald Trump for a pardon, because hey, why not.



You can read Kilpatrick's full Facebook post below.

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