Detroit sees 29 percent increase in 90-degree days since 1968

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JOSEPH NOVAK, FLICKR
  • Joseph Novak, Flickr

It was a hot one in Detroit this summer. And it's likely getting hotter in the coming years, according to a new interactive feature by the New York Times.

T
he feature lets you compare how many days, on average, cities across the U.S. could expect to see temperatures of 90 degrees or more in the year you were born versus today.

According to the results, a Detroiter born 50 years ago, in 1968, would expect 7 days of 90-degree-plus heat. Today it's risen to 9 days — an increase of 29 percent. The model predicts Detroit could see between 12 and 28 of these hot days by 2047.



This summer was exceptionally hot, with the Detroit area already logging more than 20 days hotter than 90 degrees. And we're in the middle of another heat wave, with daily highs of 90-plus degrees since Sunday. A heat advisory is in effect in metro Detroit until 10 p.m. Wednesday.

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