Michigan elects its first Democratic Secretary of State in 24 years

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JOCELYN BENSON/FACEBOOK.
  • Jocelyn Benson/Facebook.

A Democrat will hold Michigan's Secretary of State office for the first time since 1996.

With 58 percent of precincts reporting, Democrat Jocelyn Benson held a 52.9-43.9 advantage over Republican Mary Treder Lang, according to the New York Times. Benson declared victor earlier in the evening.



Benson takes over from Ruth Johnson, who is term limited. 

Benson previously said she would focus on expanding voting access, and would support no-reason absentee voting, early voting, modernizing Michigan's voter registration system, and limiting efforts to "intentionally deceive voters about their rights." (Lang, meanwhile, says she supports no-reason absentee voting, but says any change should require people to appear at a Secretary of State branch with their ID.) Benson also says she wants to make Michigan one of the most transparent states in the nation by "championing reforms that shine a light on the secret money flowing into our election process and require instant disclosure of all political and lobbying money."



As of midnight on Nov. 7, it appears Dems will also control the governor's and attorney general's office.

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