Michigan's coronavirus deaths rise by more than 100 for fourth straight day, bringing total to 1,076

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John D. Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit. - STEVE NEAVLING
  • Steve Neavling
  • John D. Dingell VA Medical Center in Detroit.

New deaths from the coronavirus in Michigan rose by more than 100 for the fourth day in a row, bringing the state’s total to 1,076.

The 117 new deaths on Thursday is the second-highest daily increase since the outbreak began last month.



Michigan ranks third in the number of deaths nationwide, behind New York and New Jersey.

Michigan now has more than 21,500 positive cases, up 1,076 from Wednesday.



The state has significantly increased its testing capacity. So far, more than 50,000 people have been tested in the state.

In Wayne County, where the coronavirus has hit the hardest, there were 58 new deaths for a total of 504. The county now has more than 10,000 positive cases, with 467 infections confirmed in the past 24 hours. Making up 18% of the state’s population, Wayne County has 46.8% of the deaths and 46.5% of the confirmed infections. Outside of New York City, Wayne County has the highest number of deaths in the U.S.

No city in Michigan has been hammered as hard as Detroit, which has a higher death rate than New York City, the epicenter of the outbreak. The city reported 25 new deaths, bringing its total to 272. Detroit also reported 6,083 confirmed cases, up 249 from Wednesday.

Statewide, 40% of the people who have died were Black, 31% white, and 24% unknown. Black people make up 33% of positive cases. Another third of the cases are unknown, and white people represent 25% of the confirmed infections.

Eleven of the state’s 83 counties have yet to confirm a COVID-19 case.

In Oakland County, there are 4,247 positive cases and 246 deaths, up 12 in the past 24 hours. Macomb County has 2,783 confirmed infections and 165 deaths, up 24 from Tuesday, its largest single-day increase. In Washtenaw County, there are 637 positive cases and 13 deaths.

Nine other Michigan counties have more than 100 confirmed cases: Genesee (755), Washtenaw (610), Kent (207), Ingham (222), Saginaw (205), Livingston (181), Monroe (165), St. Clair (162), and Jackson (131).

Outside of metro Detroit, Genesee County has the most deaths, at 48. The county’s deaths have doubled over the past four days.

Of the total cases, 1% are among patients 0 to 19 years old, 9% are 20 to 29, 13% are 30 to 39, 17% are 40 to 49, 20% are 50 to 59, 18% are 60 to 69, 13% are 70 to 79, and 9% are 80 and older.

Of the total deaths, 1% was 20 to 29, 2% were 30 to 39, 5% were 40 to 49, 11% were 50 to 59, 21% were 60 to 69, 28% were 70 to 79, and 34% were 80 and older.

The death rate is higher for men, who make up 57% of the fatalities but 46% of the positive cases.

Those who have died range in age from 20 to 107. The average age for deaths is 72.3, with a median age of 73.

Globally, there are 1.6 million coronavirus cases in 184 countries, and nearly 95,000 deaths as of Thursday afternoon, according to Johns Hopkins University & Medicine. The U.S. has more positive cases than any country in the world, with more than 450,000 confirmed infections and more than 16,200 deaths.

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