A man killed near Detroit has become a martyr for the far-right 'Boogaloo Boi' movement

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CHRIS NESSETH / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM
  • Chris Nesseth / Shutterstock.com

The Boogaloo Bois — a far-right movement calling for a second American Civil War — have made a man killed by federal agents near Detroit into their new martyr.

A 43-year-old man named Eric Allport was killed by federal agents during a shootout on Friday near a Texas Roadhouse restaurant in Madison Heights. The FBI says that Allport opened fire while they were executing an arrest warrant for a federal weapons offense, leaving one person dead and an FBI agent injured. The shooting is still under investigation, according to the Detroit Free Press.



According to Vice, many prominent Boogaloo Bois have claimed Allport as one of their own. Allport, who according to The Detroit News opened a business that trained dogs to work in drug detection, posted Boogaloo memes on Instagram and Facebook.

"Well, the feds have done it again, this time killing Eric Mark-Matthew Allport," Mike Dunn, a Boogaloo Boi from Virginia, said in a YouTube video on Monday. "As far as I know, he was a Boogaloo Boi. He embodied our ideology, our beliefs, he lived with liberty in his mind and they killed him."



"He was a member of the b.0.0.g community and believed in individual freedoms much like many of us," another Boogaloo Boi wrote on Instagram. "Myself and many others have resigned ourselves to know that our own fates will be similar to Eric's. That one day people will come for us because we wish to live our own lives without their rule."

"May his blood fuel the revolution," another Boogaloo Boi wrote on Facebook.

The Boogaloo Bois are known for wearing Hawaiian T-shirts and for igloo imagery.

A screenshot from a pr-Boogaloo Boi account mourning the death of Allport. - FACEBOOK
  • Facebook
  • A screenshot from a pr-Boogaloo Boi account mourning the death of Allport.

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