Former Lafayette Coney Island owner dies

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Lafayette Coney Island. - BRUCE GIFFIN/METRO TIMES FILE PHOTO.
  • Bruce Giffin/Metro Times file photo.
  • Lafayette Coney Island.
George Keros, the former owner of Lafayette Coney Island, died on January 24, 2019 at age 87 in his home in Naperville, Illinois.

Keros was the son of founder Vasili “William” Keros, who immigrated to Detroit from Greece with his wife, Anastasia. The elder Keros founded Lafayette Coney Island in 1924 next to American Coney Island, founded by his brother Gust Keros.



George Keros became the night manager of Lafayette when he was only 10 years old. In 1970, Keros took ownership of the restaurant after his father passed away, after having attended the University of Michigan, served in the Korean War and married his wife Mary.

Keros owned the restaurant until 1991, when he transferred ownership to his employees.



Keros had moved to Naperville, Illinois in order to be closer to his daughter, Leslie.

He is preceded in death by his wife Mary, daughter Serena Mary and brother Anthony. He is survived by his brother John, sons Steven and William, daughters Leslie and Sandra, and five grandchildren.

Angela Zielinksi is an editorial intern at Metro Times.

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