Filmmaker Stanley Nelson will examine the African American experience at Detroit Film Theatre

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PHOTO BY LARRY BUSACCA
  • Photo by Larry Busacca

When you’re a MacArthur fellow, a Peabody Award recipient, and have been granted a 2013 National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama himself, you know you’ve done something truly great. Such is the case for documentary filmmaker Stanley Nelson. From telling the story of the fight for civil rights (2010’s Freedom Riders), or the tragic murder of a 14-year-old boy in 1955 (The Murder of Emmett Till) Nelson’s gift is in the examination of the African-American experience. In this special appearance, he will screen his film Jonestown: The Life and Death of the Peoples Temple with an audience discussion. 

An Evening With Stanley Nelson will take place at the Detroit Film Theatre on Thursday, March 1 and begins at 7:30 p.m.; 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit; 313-833-7900; dia.org; Tickets are $7.50-$9.50.

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