Irwin House Gallery to throw '60s style party to close out Aretha Franklin exhibition

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Aretha Franklin portrait by Makeba Rainey - COURTESY OF IRWIN HOUSE GALLERY
  • Courtesy of Irwin House Gallery
  • Aretha Franklin portrait by Makeba Rainey
When Irwin House Gallery opened its doors last year, it did so nearly five months ahead of schedule: The gallery quickly changed its plans due to the death of Aretha Franklin. SuperNatural Woman: Tribute to the Queen was curated by gallery director Omo Misha and artist and writer John Sims to honor the spirit of the late Queen of Soul, and features a range of mediums from artists Mahogany Jones, Makeba Rainey, Marsha Music, Noreen Dean Dresser, Steven Lopez, and others. For its closing reception, the gallery has arranged for a ’60s-style house party with music curated by Drake Phifer. Guests are “encouraged to don their funkiest ’60s, Aretha-inspired attire” — channel the energy from gallery’s location, as it is just blocks away from Franklin’s father’s New Bethel Baptist Church on Linwood Street and the singer’s childhood home on LaSalle Boulevard. There will also be catering from Chef Maxcel Hardy.

SuperNatural Woman's closing reception begins at 8 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 19 at Irwin House Gallery; 2351 Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-932-7690; irwinhousegallery.org; Event is free and open to the public, a $10 donation is suggested.



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