Artist Robert Mapplethorpe celebrated with visual concert world premiere in Ann Arbor

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EMBRACE, 1982 (C) ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION. USED WITH PERMISSION
  • Embrace, 1982 (c) Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation. Used with permission

Punk poet Patti Smith once wrote, “We went our separate ways, but within walking distance of one another,” in reference to her relationship with the late artist Robert Mapplethorpe, the photographer known for his intimate and compelling portraits. Celebrating Mapplethorpe’s work 30 years after his untimely death from HIV/AIDS is the world premiere of Triptych (Eyes of One on Another). The theatrical staging composed by the National’s Bryce Dessner, directed by Kaneza Schaal features librettist Korde Arrington Tuttle and choral performances by Roomful of Teeth as well as large-scale projections of some of Mapplethorpe’s work — immersing the audience in the black-and-white world of one of the most profound American artists of the 20th century.

Triptych (Eyes of One on Another) performances begin at 8 p.m. on Friday, March 15 and Saturday, March 16 at the Power Center for the Performing Arts, Q&A will follow the performance; 121 Fletcher St., Ann Arbor; 734-763-3333; ums.org; Tickets start at $34.

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