Detroit's largest community festival, Dally in the Alley, returns for 42nd year

Staff Pick

by

comment
JAVIN HAMPTON-LATIMORE
  • Javin Hampton-Latimore

From 11 a.m. to 11 p.m., Cass Corridor will once again be transformed into a celebration of art, music, and one very busy alley. For 42 years, Dally in the Alley has withstood Cass Corridor’s ever-changing landscape to maintain its reign as Detroit’s largest community festival — and it’s free.

The volunteer-operated, family-friendly event will offer performances by more than 30 metro Detroit bands, including Leaf Erikson, Bryan Hugo Iglesias, Pet Psychic, the Stools, Deeper Waters, Tylr, Apropos, Dani Darling, and the Muggs. Per usual, a wide array of artisans and retailers will post up throughout Dally’s alley, as will more than a dozen local food vendors. For the tiny Dally goers, a kids fair will be open from noon to 4 p.m. with arts and crafts, including DIY tie-dye shirts, candle rolling, and face painting. The community stage will offer yoga, a drag show, a dog show, music from the Cass Tech Music Ensemble, and karaoke hosted by Cole Davis. Oh, and there’s beer — a lot of beer, thanks to two bountiful beer gardens.

Event runs 11 a.m.-11 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7, between Forest Avenue, Hancock Street, and Second Avenue, Detroit; dallyinthealley.com. Event is free and open to the public.


Get our top picks for the best events in Detroit every Thursday morning. Sign up for our events newsletter.

We welcome readers to submit letters regarding articles and content in Detroit Metro Times. Letters should be a minimum of 150 words, refer to content that has appeared on Detroit Metro Times, and must include the writer's full name, address, and phone number for verification purposes. No attachments will be considered. Writers of letters selected for publication will be notified via email. Letters may be edited and shortened for space.

Email us at letters@metrotimes.com.

Detroit Metro Times works for you, and your support is essential.

Our small but mighty local team works tirelessly to bring you high-quality, uncensored news and cultural coverage of Detroit and beyond.

Unlike many newspapers, ours is free – and we'd like to keep it that way, because we believe, now more than ever, everyone deserves access to accurate, independent coverage of their community.

Whether it's a one-time acknowledgement of this article or an ongoing pledge, your support helps keep Detroit's true free press free.