New exhibition at Irwin House Gallery reflects on Detroit history — and what it means for the future

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Darin Darby, Route To My Past, mixed media on board. - COURTESY OF IRWIN HOUSE GALLERY
  • Courtesy of Irwin House Gallery
  • Darin Darby, Route To My Past, mixed media on board.
Is Detroit a comeback city? Or does it take more than another Starbucks and a streetcar to bring a city back from the brink of destruction? While the global conversation toggles between these polarizing narratives, one thing remains true: all eyes are on Detroit.

But what does that mean for its future and the future of its people? Detroit Future History will display works from more than 15 artists, all of whom have additional perspectives of the city’s past, present, and, in some cases, projections of the future. Brian Nickson, Jon DeBoer, Kathleen Rashid, Melissa Vize, Damon Chamblis, Darin Darby, and Jeni Wheeler are among the featured artists, along with artist-in-residence John Sims, who will display an interactive oral-history inspired by his childhood neighborhood. Work will be on display through January 5.

Opening reception begins at 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 28 at Irwin House Gallery; 2351 W. Grand Blvd., Detroit; 313-932-7690; irwinhousegallery.org. Event is free.


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